Feb 2, 2015 · 1 minute

Some things shouldn't have to be said. Sticking a fork in an electrical outlet is a bad idea; attempting to stop a blender's blades with a finger is a worse one; and leaping from a tall building without any kind of safety net is probably the worst idea of all.

I thought not clicking on porn shared via Facebook would be one of those things. It's not as dire as sticking an appendage in a blender, but it's also pretty obvious: anyone sharing porn on Facebook is either an absolute nut-case or an attacker.

Yet it seems I was wrong. A security researcher has had to warn Facebook users not to follow links claiming to lead to pornographic websites because doing so could -- and this is the not-so-shocking part -- lead consumers to download some malware.

Scammers are using the promise of porn to convince Facebook users to download a fake version of Adobe Flash which then installs malware that automatically shares a link to the supposed-to-be-naughty video with up to 20 of their Facebook friends.

The researcher who discovered the scam claims it affected more than 110,000 Facebook users in just two days. The malware can reportedly hijack a computer's keyboard and mouse inputs; it's not clear what the ultimate purpose of the scam is.

Facebook told Threatpost that it's working to prevent this tactic, which the researcher dubbed Magnet for its ability to attract Facebook users from the accounts it compromises, from affecting more of its customers in the future.

Until then it seems a little common sense is required. Don't follow links to porn on Facebook -- you're either going to be grossed out, disappointed, or scammed. And if you still want to click that link, ask yourself a question: where's the nearest outlet?

[illustration by Brad Jonas]