Feb 26, 2015 · 1 minute

Craig Brittain, the man behind a now-defunct revenge porn site, is finding out what it's like to have private information and images proliferate on the Web without his consent.

So now he's asking Google to remove links to several pages -- which include the press release announcing his settlement with the FTC and reports on his site's downfall -- by claiming that he owns the copyright to several images published without his permission.

Brittain also believes there's something wrong with the media. As he said in January in an open letter -- courtesy of the Washington Post, since I'm not linking to his website:

'I strongly believe that the Mainstream Media uses revenge and shame narratives to exploit people and ruin their lives – not unlike what ‘Revenge Porn’ does,' he wrote in an open letter in late January. He goes on to argue that the media should be 'held to the same standards as revenge porn sites,' because they also 'display someone’s information in a way that portrays them in a negative light.'
Just let that sink in. A man who operated a website used to share nude images, phone numbers, and other information about women who had to pay between $200 and $500 to have them taken down, is upset that the media is reporting on that website's shuttering.

Brittain's wishes will probably go unheeded. As Ars Technica, which published one of the stories he wants removed from search results, explained in a post about the ironic request:

The DMCA requires Internet companies like Google to remove links to infringing content at a rights holder's request or face legal liability. In this instance, fair use and general First Amendment principles are on Google's and the media's side.

Brittain's takedown requests likely wouldn't even qualify for removal in Europe under the "right to be forgotten" rulingfrom the European High court in May. The decision requires search engines to take down "inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant” materials from search results upon request by EU citizens. So a man who encouraged people to send images of their exes, and who hassled women when they wanted their images removed from his website, is unlikely to have his own images pulled from Google's search results. If that isn't some poetic justice, I don't know what is.